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Correlation Between Joint Position Sense, Threshold To Detection of Passive Motion of The Knee Joint And Walking Speed of Post-Stroke Patient

Volume: 83  ,  Issue: 1 , August    Published Date: 26 August 2021
Publisher Name: IJRP
Views: 64  ,  Download: 23 , Pages: 110 - 118    
DOI: 10.47119/IJRP100831820212180

Authors

# Author Name
1 Kurnia Imanawanto
2 Meisy Andriana
3 Rwahita Satyawati

Abstract

Background: Sensori motor dysfunction such as muscle weakness, impaired sensation, changes in muscle tone, reduced movement control are common in stroke patients. Locomotion function requires continuous afferent sensory input. Impairment of sensory function can hinder the ability to recruit muscles during walking. Patients generally walk slowly, cadence, step and stride length are shorter and the double phase of support increases. Goal: Analyzing the correlation between the propioceptive function of the knee joint and walking speed in post-stroke patients, who are treated at the Outpatient Medical Rehabilitation Clinic of RSU Dr.Soetomo Surabaya. Methode: An observational analytic cross sectional study, nine subjects measured walking speed (10MWT), joint position sense (JPS) and threshold to detetction of passive motion (TTDPM) of the knee joint, in the period March - November 2020.. Results: There is a moderate correlation between 10MWT and JPS 150 on the non-paretic side (r 0.676; p=0.045) and JPS 300 on the paretic side (r 0.668; p=0.049). And there is a strong correlation between 10MWT and JPS 600 on the paretic side (r 0.824; p=0.006). However, there is no significant correlation between 10MWT and TTDPM. Conclusion: There is correlation between the propioceptive function of the knee joint and the walking speed of post-stroke patients. The smaller the percentage of joint position error, the stronger the correlation with walking speed.

Keywords

  • 10 meter walking test; joint position sense; threshold to detection of passive motion; knee joint; proprioception; stroke.