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Technology Leadership Standards of Education Leaders, Teachers’ Technological Adoption and the Integration of Technologies in the Classroom

Volume: 124  ,  Issue: 1 , May    Published Date: 11 May 2023
Publisher Name: IJRP
Views: 266  ,  Download: 178 , Pages: 1275 - 1314    
DOI: 10.47119/IJRP1001241520234818

Authors

# Author Name
1 MARK ANTHONY S. PALOMA

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between the technology leadership among education leaders in the Division of Laguna, the technological adoption of teachers, and the integration of technologies in the classroom. The study addressed several questions including the level of technology leadership standards among educational leaders, the level of teachers technological adoption relative to technological acceptance and technology readiness and the level of integration of technologies in the classrooms relative to learning organization and class engagement. It also examines the significant relationship between the technology leadership standards, teachers technological adoption and the integration of technologies in the classroom. The study sampled 333 public junior high school teachers and their 188 students from Kalayaan, Lumban, Pagsanjan, Majayjay, and Santa Cruz districts. The descriptive-correlated research method was used, and the data were collected using standardized and modified research questionnaires. Analysis revealed that education leaders have a very high technology leadership standards based on the following weighted mean of 4.29, 4.40, 4.44, 4.43 and 4.35 with the standard deviation of 0.60, 0.59, 0.62, 0.60 and 0.59. Teachers technological adoption in relation to technological acceptance was also very high having a weighted mean of 4.61 and 4. 31 and a standard deviation of 0.53 and 0.61, while teachers technological adoption in relation to technology readiness garnered the weighted mean of 4.35, 3.92, 3.32, and 3.92 with the standard deviation of 0.56, 0.56, 0.88 and 0.68 which are interpreted as very high, high, moderately high and high respectively. On the other hand, the integration of technologies in the classroom in terms of learning organization scored the following weighted mean of 4.29, 4.09, 4.08 and 4. 27 with the standard deviation of 0.45, 0.54, 0.50 and 0.50 and interpreted as high, high, high and very high respectively. For the integration of technologies in the classroom in terms of class engagement the weighted mean is 4.15,3.92,4.14 and 4.19 with standard deviation of 0.55, 0.68, 0.54 and 0.58 respectively and all are interpreted as high. The findings of the study revealed that there is a significant relationship between technology leadership standards of education leaders and teachers technological adoption. Although the relationship was weak but statistically significant at 0.05 levels of significance which means having strong technology leadership can promote technology adoption among teachers in educational settings. Education leaders who demonstrate certain leadership standards are more likely to have teachers who adopt technology. Specifically, leadership qualities such as being an advocate for fairness and empowerment, planning strategically, and being a lifelong learner were found to be related to teachers adoption of technology. However, there is no significant relationship between technology leadership standards and integration of technologies in the classroom. This was determined by analyzing survey data, which showed a weak correlation and most p-values not meeting the significance alpha level of 0.05. It was found that leadership qualities such as equity and citizen advocate, visionary planner, empowering leader, system designer and connecter learner did not have a significant impact on technology integration in classrooms. This suggests that education leaders may not be able to influence how much technology is used in classrooms through their leadership practices. The recommendations include the development of policies and guidelines on the use of technology in the classroom by the Department of Education, provisions of professional development opportunities and ensuring equitable access to technological tools and resources. Education leaders should prioritize effective use of technology for teaching practices promote digital literacy among students through safe and responsible use policies while protecting student data privacy. Educators can communicate with education leaders about useful technology integration strategies within their own classrooms which could lead towards more effective strategies being implemented across schools and districts. Future researchers may explore different types of educational settings using mixed method approaches alongside quantitative data collection methods for more nuanced insights into participants experiences with integrating technologies into their teaching practices along with evaluating long-term effects by conducting follow-up surveys after several years have passed since implementation.